Tag Archives: Krishnamacharya

Links page

On this page you will find the main links that we use, either for the purchase of equipment, or to visit Ashtanga Yoga teacher friends, etc.

Equipment

A specific nature of Ashtanga Yoga, it is that a carpet is enough to practice. Below a list with some addresses for you obtain this material :

  

Web sites on Ashtanga Yoga

Official website of Sri K.Pattabhi Jois, Krishnamacharya, BKS Iyengar

Other sites of our friends

Belgium :

France :

Paris

Rennes (Bretagne)

  • Cécile Dalibard Raout : La Basse Lande, 35190 CARDROC – Telephone : 99.45.82.09
  • http://www.aray.fr Yan & Anne-Marie Le Boucher, Luc Carimalo & Mireille Drouet, etc.

Fourmies (Nord of France)

Greece :

 

About Ashtanga Yoga Teacher Workshop

A message from R. Sharath (Guruji’s Grandson)

« In this modern world, everything is instant. No one has patience. Everyone wants to have [everything] as soon as possible. In yoga also it has become like that. Many places you go, they certify you in 15 days, one month. Always someone who’s coming to India, they think, “Oh, I’ll be here for one month, I should get a certificate that I’m studying here.”
We get many phone calls. Last week also there were three phone calls, one from Delhi, one from England, another from America.
Straight away they said “Oh, do you have teacher training.”
Yoga is getting big but it is getting crazy also. It’s not that yoga is crazy. People are making it crazy. They’re not understanding the sense of yoga, the purity of yoga. A yoga teacher should always maintain the purity of the practice.

You know when I was a child, whenever I used to see a Chinese or a Japanese, I thought they knew Karate. We used to stay away from them because we thought they knew Karate. Because we had been to see ‘Enter the Dragon,’ the Bruce Lee movie. Then there was no television or anything, the only entertainment was to go to a theatre and watch a movie. So, we watched that movie, and we thought every Chinese, Japanese knows martial arts. So he can beat us up, so stay away from them. And now [the] same thing has happened to yoga. Whoever looks like an Indian, if he is dressed in a saffron, or even a lungi (traditional South Indian dress), he becomes a yogi. Many yogis are sprouting up everywhere. Why I’m saying this is, for a practitioner [of yoga] it is very important to choose your teacher. A teacher who can guide you properly. A teacher who knows, who has been practicing for many years, who has come from a lineage. That is very important.

Bhagavad-Gita, "the song of the blessed.

Bhagavad-Gita, “the song of the blessed.

Sharath quotes from BhagavadGītā (Ch 4, vs 1-2)

imam vivasvate yogaṃ proktavanahamavyayam vivasvanmanave praha manuriksvakave-bravit evam paramparapraptamimam rajarsayo viduḥ sa kaleneha mahata yogo nastah parantapa

The BhagavadGītā is a very big, is a beautiful book.
It says – eighteen chapters – it all says about yoga practice.
How one should learn yoga through paramparā. paramparā is learning through a lineage. Like how Krishnamacharya learned from Ramamohan Brahmachari, Pattabhi Jois learned from Krishnamacharya. You know it’s a lineage, it’s not like a cell phone booth you open here (pointing outside). Every street has a cell phone booth. A correct sādhaka (practitioner), sādhanā
(practice) is very important to transmit from a teacher to his students. For a teacher to transmit the knowledge to his students, first he has to learn it for many years. He has to experience it within him[self]. Then only it is possible to transfer the correct method to his students.

Now days you get so many videos on You-tube, it is very difficult to make out which is circus, which is yoga, which is what. All crazy yogas. All different stupid yogas. For everything they join yoga. Naked Yoga! What is this nonsense?
Kookoo yoga. Hot Yoga. What is Hot Yoga? Hoot Yoga, Heat Yoga, Bang Yoga, all these crazy yogas, for everything they join yoga.
But it is our duty, being a practitioner of yoga. Some of you are also teaching. It is very important to keep the purity. If we don’t keep the purity within us, in another ten years, fifteen years, yoga will have a different meaning. Yoga is described in many different ways:

  1. Union, union of the jivatma or individual soul when it gets connected or joins with the supreme soul is called as ‘yoga.
  2. Or, yoga is the way of [to obtain] mokṣa (liberation)
  3. Liberation [itself] is called as ‘yoga.’

So there are different explanations for yoga. It can be experienced in different ways. Once you become one with everything, it becomes yoga. So that’s union, we call it.
So for yoga, to practice yoga, sādhanā (practice) is very important. If you do it for one year, two years, three years, you won’t go to the depth of yoga. If you want to go deep…
if you just keep on sailing in the sea it will never end. You’ll get bored. You’ll get bored and you won’t learn anything. Once you dive inside the sea, once you go deeper inside the sea, you can see the beauty of the sea… Once you go deeper in your practice, you can experience so many good things. Different things, which our practice can give us. This can be experienced only when we have devotion, dedication, discipline and determination – Four D’s. All these are very important in our practice. You know yogis have a disciplined life. Why we have a disciplined life ? Because our mind shouldn’t get cancala.
Cancala means distracted. If I go for a party late… for example, I’ll tell you, every day I get up at one o’clock [am to practice. One day I get bored and I go to a party… then I go and fight with somebody… then my mind becomes distracted. Next day I think, “Oh why did I do that ?” We don’t want to create circumstances that make us do something… after fifteen days I think, “Oh, why did I do that.” But the yogi’s mind, by practicing every day, day by day, yoga gets stronger within you, and your mind doesn’t sit still, it thinks about ‘what is yoga ?’ Those kind of thoughts should come within you. What is ahiṃsā (non-violence), what is satya, (truth) ?’ These kinds of thoughts should come within you when you are practicing āsana(s).

When you’re practicing yoga these kinds of thoughts should come within you. Then automatically it comes within you, you will start to think “Oh, ahimsa.” When non-violence comes, as being a practitioner, I should follow this. So when you follow that there’ll be no conflicts. Like that each yama, niyama, the ten sub limbs… develop strongly within us, once it gets stronger and stronger we get a better meaning to our practice. If I just keep on doing asana(s) without thinking anything, not getting those kinds of thoughts… it will just become like working out in a gym, lifting weights… What is the use of that ?
A beautiful body what’s the use if you don’t have a good heart.
Without a good heart, good thinking is of no use.

So this āsana is the foundation for our spiritual practice.
To build a spiritual building first the foundation should be proper. So once we are not disturbed by these many things, all you have is purity inside you. Is it not true? So that is the transformation if you do it for a long time when we have dedication, devotion towards the practice – sraddhavam labhate jnanam – sraddha – who has devotion, faith in their practice, he can get the knowledge, he can realize the purity of our practice. If you are very ignorant, if you do for twenty-five, thirty years also, you won’t realize what it is. It just becomes physical.

Once we realize that, the transformation that is trying to happen within you, then you’ll get a beautiful meaning to your practice. It is a development which should happen slowly… when we take birth, how we make this body, slowly we grow our body… So when we are a baby there are many things we don’t know… when we are a child it’s all imagination. Is it not true? It’s all fantasy when we are children. Yoga also starts like that… but as you get older and wiser in practice, the meaning also changes… Early on yoga practice was not wise enough.

As you go deeper, practice becomes deeper, wiser. Like a plant in the ground, it must be nourished properly to make it grow… Once you nourish the plant properly the plant will grow and a flower will blossom. If you don’t nourish the roots then the flower will never blossom. Exactly like that, for asana, yama, niyama are the nourishment which our mind needs to get.
Done like that then the yoga will grow and it will blossom within us. For this it doesn’t happen that easily. To gain something you have to lose something – here you’re losing all the bad things – many things you have to sacrifice… This is what I have learned from, from whom?… My influence is my grandfather [Guruji]. Every day at 3:30am, he was chanting, ready by 4:00am to teach classes. [I learned] by watching him and assisting him for many years.

The relationship between a Guru and Siṣya is like father and son relation. The same [relationship] was between Krishnamacharya and Pattabhi Jois, and one more student Mahadeva Bhat (Guruji’s fellow student). [Guruji] did practice in the morning, theory at 12:00pm every day [with Krishnamacharya]. Like that only the knowledge will transfer to students. In this instant world nobody has the patience. All they want is a piece of paper – what is a piece of paper, which is of no use… The real yoga practitioner doesn’t care if he’s certified, yoga keeps happening within him. The yoga gets stronger and stronger within him. So why I’m telling this is many people have different opinions, different imagination about yoga. If you jump back properly that means you’re a yogi ! Who can do handstand is a big yogi… We have to improve our knowledge, improve our yogic knowledge, spiritual knowledge. Once we improve that within us, then we are trying to become yogis. Now days everybody puts “Yogī(s), Yoginī(s), we have a party please come.” Yogi(s) and Yoginī(s) never go to parties… [A] yogi wants to be silent, to sit, be calm, [to] do his practice. We are still trying to become yogis still trying to become yogini(s).
Still going in that direction but not yet reached. Some are very far, some are ahead, once we get enlightened, we have reached [the end]. What we do in this life carries on to the next life ».

R. Sharath Jois

History of Yoga Korunta (Ashtanga Yoga)

Travelling in the North of India to spread the science of Yoga for the treatment of various ailments, Sri T. Krishnamacharya – thanks to the patronage of the Maharajah of Mysore (well known for his philanthropy and spiritual faith) – discovered by chance, in the 1930s, in the university Library of Calcutta, an ancient manuscript written on palm leaves and entitled “Yoga Korunta”. The author, a sage of ancient times, called himself “Vanama”. Composed between 500 and 1500 BC, the document was excellently preserved. Also a specialist in ancient Sanskrit, Sri T. Krishnamacharya understood from the turn of certain phrases that it was part of a much older oral tradition (between 3000 and 4000 years BC).

Sri T. Krishnamacharya

Sri T. Krishnamacharya

Following this discovery, Sri T. Krishnamacharya, who taught a different method of yoga, altered his teaching for the third time. He asked Sri K. Pattabhi Jois to devote himself exclusively to this method of original Yoga, called Yoga Korunta, and to pass it on.

From 1937 onwards, Pattabhi taught Yoga Korunta in Mysore, India.

Only in the late 1960s, André Van Lysebeth, the first teacher of European yoga, spends three months to study Yoga in India with Pattabhi.

André speaks of him and the quality of his training and popularizes him by publishing laudatory articles in the paper « YOGA » which he edits.

La "REVUE YOGA"

La “REVUE YOGA”

Around 1973, Americans participate in the demonstration of yoga by Manju (Pattabhi’s son) in the ashram of Gitānanda (near Pondicherry). Thus Norman Allen became a pupil of Pattabhi or Guruji, as his disciples call him, later Nancy Gilgoff and David Williams came.

Pattabhi chose to use the term “Ashtanga” for his school in reference to one of the six points of view of orthodox Indian philosophy, i.e. Yoga. The other points of view are: Nyāya, Vaisheshika, Sāṃkhya, Mîmâmsâ, Vedānta.

The bible of Yoga, written by Patañjali, is “The Yoga Sūtra” (a kind of synthesis of all the preceding knowledge).

In the second chapter of this book, at verse (YS II-29) the foundations of the practice of yoga are being explained, the definition of which is “aṣṭāṅga yoga”. Thus, all the spiritual techniques referring to this book can be called aṣṭāṅga yoga.

This way the name of “Yoga Korunta” was changed to “Ashtanga Yoga”. Actually, the institute of Pattabhi was called “Ashtanga Yoga Research Institute of Mysore”, which made the American students think that he taught a kind of Yoga called “Ashtanga Yoga”.

In 1975, Nancy Gilgoff and David Williams invited Guruji and his son Manju, who thus set off on their first voyage to America in order to teach yoga. Manju stayed in the United States. This practice of Yoga spread rapidly throughout America from California, extending up to Hawaii, under the name of Ashtanga Yoga.

Les livrets de JB Rishi sur l'Ashtanga Yoga

In Europe, the first teachers to spread this method were called Jean-Pierre Radhu (Belgium), Gabriel Plessis (Paris, Rouen – 1972). With the permission of Guruji, Jean Bernard Rishi in Paris (France 1975) published leaflets on the sun salutations of Mysore and the standing postures (photos of Pattabhi in black and white). Having taught Ashtanga Yoga for several years, they all changed their methods of different reasons. Later, Jean Claude Garnier (France, Belgium – 1978) and Serge Fonteneau (France, Château Renauld) embraced the teachings of Pattabhi and have made it their business to disseminate them.

Today, this traditional form of Yoga, mainly known under the name of Ashtanga Yoga, is one of the most practiced worldwide.

Sharath Rangaswamy, the grandson of Sri K. Pattabhi Jois, teaches the Ashtanga Yoga he has learnt from his grandfather.

 

For further reading :

  • Yoga Mala – Sri K. Pattabhi Jois (paperback)
  • Ashtanga Yoga – John Scott (Le courrier du livre).
  • Ashtanga Yoga – Le Guide Pratique: Un Guide Illustré Destiné à une Pratique Personnelle, Première et Deuxième… de David Swenson

Visit the Theosophical Society in Chennai

The most important world headquarters of Theosophical Society worldwide was designed to facilitate and encourage Comparative Religious Studies, as well as Philosophy and Science and rational thinking.

The Society is located on the magnificent wild banks of the river Adyar. Madame Blavatsky and Colonel Olcott founded the Society in the United States; in 1882 it moved to Adyar.

Apart from the remains of the different faiths and beliefs and the peaceful Commemoration Garden, there is a 95-year old Library with an excellent collection of rare oriental manuscripts written on palm leaves and parchment paper.

Timetable Closed on Telephone
10hOO – 12h0014h00 – 17h00 Sunday 2491 2904 / 2491 8431.
Theosophical Society, entrance

Theosophical Society, entrance

Jean Claude Garnier

Jean Claude Garnier was born on 10 March 1948 at Rouen in Normandy, France. Seriously ill during his childhood, he discovered yoga by reading Indra Devi’s book; she was the first American to study yoga with Sri Krishnamacharya. He was then 14 years old.

Krishnamacharya & Desikachar & Indra Devi

Krishnamacharya, Desikachar & Indra Devi

He followed his path with the companions of the “Communauté de l’Arche”, founded by Lanza Del Vasto, the first Christian disciple of Mahatma Gandhi. He was 20 when, on their recommendation, he met Jean-Paul Boudon (Satyananda Bihar School) and B.K.S. Iyengar.

At the beginning of his first two-year trip to India, while digging wells and improving land for agriculture, he met Vinoba Bhave, Gandhi’s successor. He studied yoga with Swami Gitanandha in Pondicherry and then stayed for a time at Sri Aurobindo’s ashram where he met “The Mother”.

Jean Claude, digging the foundations of the Matrimandir, Auroville, India

He came back to France in 1972, and lived for a few months in Father Dechanet’s hermitage. In 1973 he started his first yoga classes in Rouen. At the same time, he pursued his yoga teacher training with Denise and André Van Lysebeth in Switzerland.

He then studied with Jean-Bernard Rishi who at that time was one of Pattabhi Jois’s students. He met BKS Iyengar through Noël Perrez and was so impressed that he went to Puna to study with him for several years.

On a trip in South India in 1978 he met Sri Pattabhi Jois who became his Master. He studied with him every year until 1998.

To better understand anatomy and the locomotor system, Jean Claude decided to learn general and cranial osteopathy. He then began psycho-corporal psychotherapy in accordance with W. Reich’s theories, and followed several courses to become a psychotherapist.

JC en1973 en Eka Pada Shrisasana

JC en1973 en Eka Pada Shrisasana

He then learned energetic osteopathy, acupuncture and dietetics. He has been a vegetarian for 47 years.

Jean Claude enjoys combining all his knowledge and experience. He divides his time between teaching yoga – in Brussels, at the Institute he has lovingly created in Uccle, and in France, Greece and India – and giving treatment in energetic, general and cranial osteopathy, and acupuncture.

The yoga teaching he gives is faithful to the Yoga Korunta transmitted by Sri Pattabhi Jois at the “Asthanga Research Institute” in Mysore.

Sri K. Pattabhi Jois

Sri K. Pattabhi Jois

Sri K. Pattabhi Jois has learned, developed, and taught others Ashtanga Yoga

Sri K. Pattabhi Jois, was born on July 26, 1915, a day of the full moon, in a small village near Somnathpur in Karnataka in South India. He died on May 18, 2009, at the age of 94.

His father, Krishna Pattabhi Jois, was a well-known astrologer in the service of the Maharajah of Mysore.

After his primary and secondary schooling in 1930 he began studying Sanskrit and Vedic philosophy at the Maharaja Sanskrit College in Mysore. In 1937, he graduated, he immediately went into teaching Sanskrit at the University of Mysore and continued until 1973. He spent another three years teaching at the Ayur Vedic College, and he then retired.

He began studying Yoga in 1927, when he was 12 years old. He then lived with his parents in a small village near Hassan “Kowshek” (Karnataka). During the first three years, he undertook a journey back and forth every day to visit his Guru Sri T. Krishnamacharya, who lived in Mysore at that time (a distance of some 35 km). He received the teaching of his master for 25 years (from 1927 to 1952). Krishnamacharya asked him to transmit a method of original Yoga, called Yoga Korunta (known today as Ashtanga Yoga). Sri K. Pattabhi Jois taught Yoga in India from 1937, then later in the U.S.A and Europe. He received students from around the world to study this wonderful method of Yoga.

He was the founder-director of the Ashtanga Yoga Research Institute in Mysore in 1942. In 1946, he founded the Institute for Research on Ashtanga Yoga, where he experimented and developed the healing powers of Yoga. He was appointed Honorary Professor of Yoga at the Indian Government Medical College in Mysore, from 1976 to 1978.

Shri K. Pattabhi Jois was married with the delicious Savitramma, known as her diminutive Amma). She left us far too early in December 1997. She always wore a smile, offered comfort or had a blessing on her lips and she prepared an absolutely delicious coffee.

What is less well known is that she had also studied and practiced Yoga and sacred Shri T. Krishnamacharya texts. This is where she met Guruji. She was 14 when she was married, a marriage of love which was very rare at the time. They had three children, two boys and a girl (their eldest son Ramesh died in an accident on the Kaveri dam).

Manju Jois

Manju Jois

Manju, their son, teaches Yoga at Emanitas in California – U.S.A. Saraswati, their daughter still lives in Mysore, she is married to a professor and also teaches yoga.

andrevanlysebeth

In 1964, André Van Lysbeth, the first European, came to study the Korunta Yoga at the Ashtanga Yoga Research Institute in Mysore with Guruji. André spoke about him and made him known through an article he published in the early review of the time “YOGA”, which he edited.

Around 1972, Sri Pattabhi Jois received the first Americans after the “meeting” with Manju at the Gitananda ashram near Pondicherry (160 km south of Madras). The practice of Ashtanga Yoga spread in America from California, and extended later to Hawaii. In 1975, Guruji and Manju on their first tour spread the word about the practice of yoga. Since then, the practice of Ashtanga Yoga has spread worldwide.

 

Guruji passed on to the other side of existence on 18 May 2009 at 2:30pm in the afternoon (local Mysore time).   Guruji had taught continuously for 63 years this wonderful method that he had learned from his Guru Sri T. Krishnamacharya in 1927.

Chidambaram flowers

Om Loka Samasta Sukhino Bhavantu Om Shanti, Shanti, Shanti Om (Om, may all beings achieve peace and harmony, Om Shanti).

 

Today, his grandson Sharath Rangaswamy, the son of Sarasvati, is Director of the Institute. He was born in 1971. He is transmitting the Ashtanga Yoga he learned from his grandfather. Sharath is married to Shruthi and he is the happy father of two children, a charming little girl called Shradda (Dedication), and a son Sambhav (connected to the being or Manifestation of being).

 

The new Yoga course room “Yogashala” can be found :

  • Ashtanga Yoga Research Institute
235, 8th Cross
2nd Main, 3rd Stage
Gokulam, Mysore 570 002
Karnataka, India

Kollywood, the major movie studios to visit in Chennai

The major film studios are nicknamed Kollywood. They compete with those of Bombay …(Bollywood). There are the AVM studios and the Prasad studios. Unlike the Bombay studios, they are generally open to visitors.

You must have the luck to pass by on a day where there is a shooting.

I attended a filming in the Prasad studios, and found it very amusing, especially because of the contrast between some very basic logistics and some hyper sophisticated equipment. The cardboard decorations with the colour remaining stuck on my fingers were not bad either !

 

India remains the largest producer of films in the world.
The film industry in India is the largest in the world, 4 times that of Hollywood

These films have a huge success in India, but also in Indonesia, Iraq, Africa: Egypt, Morocco, Nigeria etc..

Why do we know almost nothing of this cinema, here?

It has the reputation of being superficial, kitsch, without artistic creativity. Always the same stories with variations on the theme of love or the struggle of good against evil, and the actors play very stereotypical roles. The characteristics of these movies are: they last over 3 hours; the scenarios are always interspersed with songs (5-6 songs), music and sumptuous choreographies, a finely tuned mixture as the spices in a curry

Movies, songs

Very commercial, this cinema meets the public expectations who require several dances, a love story, comedy, melodrama, all according to a carefully balanced mixture like the spices in a “masala” or a “curry”.
Unlike Hollywood where music is a genre in itself, in Indian cinema, songs and dances are an integral part of the unfolding of the story and screenplay.
It is a cinema, standardized to the extreme and famous for it’s kitsch. In fact, it is simply a different cinematic language to ours. As explained by Anne-Gaëlle Doshi, consultant in the seventh art of the subcontinent :
“Indian cinema has very strict and very Indian codes traveling poorly in the West, which is what causes the reluctance, but once these codes are acquired and have been accepted, it can be lots of fun.”

 

The year 2013 saw the centenary of the Indian film industry: “100 Years Of Indian Cinema industry.”

 

Photos :

Videos :

South India and music :

A glimpse on Madras – Chennai :

For Tamil movies :

And also the site :

We recommend that you visit Chennai, a big sprawling town, near Mahābalipuram.

Chennai,

Like many other large towns in India, Madras which has been renamed “Chennai” in 1996 (7 millions inhabitants), may seem at first disconcerting and hostile for the traveller who has just arrived.

Road traffic as in any other Indian town is dense, noisy and colourful. Notwithstanding the town has some charm. The cultural life is vibrant and the beaches are beautiful.

The gateway to South India

In fact to appreciate Chennai one has to accept to spend some time, enough to discover the wealth of its cultural heritage. Though the absence of major monuments means few tourists visit the capital of Dravidian art.

Some of the great and exciting things to do and see in Chennai:

  • Going for a stroll on the immense Marina Beach on a Friday or Saturday after sunset. It attracts a huge crowd of Indians in festive mood. On offer are: shooting, riding horse, foodstalls, drinks (sugar cane juice), merry-go-round for children and adults, shops with flashy and twinkling gadgets. One can also have his or her photograph taken with a cardboard cut effigy of a Bollywood star. Expect a long queue, etc…
  • The Governement Art Gallery, a must see
  • The temple of Kapaleeswarar
  • the Theosophical Society, south of Chennai
  • the Kollywood Studios which compete with Bollywood in Mombai. The first silent film in Tamil was shot in 1916. The AVM and Prasad Studios are opened to the public.
  • The factory of the legendray Royal Enfield motorbikes
  • San Thome Cathedral (St. Thomas), Mount St. Thomas (for its view of the city of Chennai and Little Mount.


Little Mount.

The sequence of rhythmic postures: the sun salutation

The Sun Salutation or Sūryanamaskāra is a dynamic sequence of postures; it is a ritual in honor of the rising sun. This prepares the postural work that gives warmth to the body, the heart and soul.

Sunrise at Mahabalipuram

Sunrise at Mahabalipuram

Originally, the Sun Salutation is a ritual, a morning prayer, in honor of the rising sun.

“Surya” (sun) and “Namaskara” (salutation), and “prostration” are Sanskrit terms. This dynamic sequence of postures is native to Iran; it arrived in India with the Parsi, who consider the Sun Salutation as a religious duty.

The sun salutation is used in the Ashtanga Yoga

The notorious Mysore salutations, called “A” & “B” have been transmitted by Sri Krishnamacharya & Sri Pattabhi Jois. These greetings serve as a transition between postures and as a postural preparation.

  • Warm-up (muscles)
  • Release of large articulations
  • Limbering up of the spine
  • Exercises done with the synchronization of the breath (Viniyasa)

“ if the government itself understood its usefulness, and made the practice of yogāsana, the Sūryanamaskāra, and their traditions compulsory for all students in all educational institutions, boys and girls, it would help to render their lives pure, it would be render a great service to the world ”.
Sri K. Pattabhi Jois

 Sūrya Namaskāra A :

Tadāsana, Uttanāsana A, Uttanāsana B, Chaturanga Dandāsana, Ûrdhva Mukha Svanāsana, Chaturanga Dandāsana, Adhomukha Svanāsana, Uttanāsana B, Uttanāsana A, Tadāsana, Samasthitiḥ.

Salutation au soleil A

Sūrya Namaskāra B :

Tadāsana, Utkatâsana, Uttanāsana A, Uttanāsana B, Chaturanga Dandāsana, Ûrdhva Mukha Svanâsana, Chaturanga Dandāsana, Adhomukha Svanâsana, Vīrabhadrāsana A, Chaturanga Dandāsana, Ûrdhva Mukha Svanāsana, Chaturanga Dandāsana, Adhomukha Svanâsana, Vīrabhadrāsana A, Chaturanga Dandāsana, Ûrdhva Mukha Svanāsana, Chaturanga Dandāsana, Adhomukha Svanâsana, Uttanāsana B, Uttanāsana A, Utkatâsana, Samasthitiḥ.

There is therefore always a movement during which we inhale followed by one during which we exhale.

Salutation au soleil B

Benefits of practicing Sūryanamaskāra (The Sun Salutation)

Regular rhythmic practice (every day) will gradually provide you with perfect health:

  • It softens and strengthens the muscles of the body
  • It activates intestinal regulation by increasing digestive fire
  • It purifies and develops the lungs and heart

Sūryanamaskāra will help you develop willpower, stamina, mental strength; all of them are qualities that are essential to achieve the goal of Yoga. It is a meditation in action.

All yoga practitioners know the Sun Salutation

Power Yoga, Vinyasa Yoga, Vinyasa Flow and other Yoga methods use the Salutation.

This is “the” Yoga technique that uses the cardiovascular system. It provides heat and considerable energy. André Van Lysebeth quickly taught the sun salutation to increase heartbeat and heat.

Sūryanamaskā, André Van Lysebeth

Sūryanamaskā, André Van Lysebeth

 

Other forms of salutations according to traditions

There are Buddhist or Muslim salutations, the Tibetan prostrations (“The Five Tibetans”). In India there is the Raja Aundh salutation, originating from Sivananda, which is well known in Europe thanks to André Van Lysebeth.

Finally, less known, is the Moon Salutation used in the Tantric tradition (Chandra Namaskara)

Become an Ashtanga Yoga professor thanks to the training given by the Ashtanga Yoga Institute in Brussels

The Ashtanga Yoga Institute in Brussels perpetuates the teachings of Sri K. Pattabhi Jois. Since 1973, Jean Claude Garnier trains students, in Europe and Asia, to deepen their knowledge about Yoga. Some of the students will find a calling and become a Yoga Professor and in turn, transmit the art of Yoga.

The Institute is open to different currents of Yoga. Jean Claude Garnier pursues the transmission of Ashtanga Yoga as taught by Krishnamacharya and his disciples B.K.S. Iyengar, and Sri K. Pattabhi Jois.

Sri K. Pattabhi Jois

Sri K. Pattabhi Jois

Training and recycling as a Yoga professor, who is concerned ?

  • People who practice Yoga and wish to deepen their self-knowledge in order to obtain a better body and mind balance
  • Those who wish to deepen their approach of the tradition of Yoga
  • Future teachers who wish to teach Yoga in Europe – this requires a commitment to a course of minimum 5 modules
  • Existing Yoga teachers who wish to broaden their personal knowledge with an ancient and dynamic method
  • Yoga teachers who have the obligation to improve and develop their existing skills

How does the training with personal monitoring take place ?

  • You deepen your knowledge of the practice of Yoga: first, second and third series
  • You study Yoga and its philosophy
  • You learn to observe during classes (group and private classes)
  • You progressively assist the teacher during classes
  • You will be supervised as of your first class, in order to answer your questions.

How to obtain a diploma

The Yoga teacher training consists of a set of modules.

At the end of each module there is a practical and theoretical evaluation.

Once you have successfully passed a module, you can move on to the next one.

You need to complete a minimum of 5 modules (A, B, C, D, E, F) and write a thesis which summarizes your studies and research on one of the aspects of Yoga.

This diploma is a requisite to :

  • Practice the profession in European countries
  • Teach in a recognised Institute
  • Register to the national professional database
  • Get an insurance
  • As an asset for your students

 European PDF laws

European Yoga Union: http://www.yogaeurop.com/index.php?categoryid=21

Proto Shiva, of the Indus civilization

Proto Shiva, of the Indus civilization

 Content covered during the training

Theoretical documentation will be given to you at the end of each module in electronic version (with an access to “training”)

 Topics

  • Anatomy
  • Physiology
  • Psychology
  • Pedagogy
  • Professional ethics
  • History
  • Etymology
  • Indian sacred texts

Also discussed: communication, oral and written expression, dietetics, lifestyle…

 Course content of Training Module A

  • Postural practice first & second series (Sádhaná Yoga)

Postural foundations, supports, reviewing and improvement of postures and their variations; breathing techniques in postures (pranayama); development of concentration, letting go, individual work and group work, workshops, first trials of teaching.

 

Theoretical courses

  • Classical Indian Tradition through its Vedic origins
  • Invocations (prayer at the beginning of the class): explanation, its significance and its meaning.
  • Theory and practice of Ashtanga Yoga (Mula Bandha, uddiyana, Ujjayi Pranayama, Vinyasa)
  • Knowledge of anatomy related to postural practice
  • Importance of stretching during Yoga postures
  • Use of Sanskrit during courses
  • Religious festivals
  • The creation of the world (Taittiriya Aranyaka viewed by Veda)
  • The life, work and education of Sivananda, Sri Ramakrishna, Swami Ramdas, Yogi Ram Surat Kumar, Sri Yukheswar, Alain Danielou, Krishnamurti.

Check the PDF files to see the content of the other training modules

Admissions

The admission procedures are common to all schools of the National Federation of Yoga Teachers

To enrol in the first year of training you must:

  • Have practiced Yoga for at least 2 years with one or more teachers and have one of the teachers complete a sponsorship record
  • Be over 18 years old
  • Have a general level of education or equivalent vocational training at high-school level.

When and where:

  • India: the longest training (one month)
  • Greece: condensed training (two weeks)
  • Belgium: all year long (10 weekends from September to June / July)