Tag Archives: Jean Claude Garnier

Yoga teacher Marie Wittock

Sivananda Yoga is a traditional form of Haṭha Yoga from Northern India, which includes two breathing exercises, 12 main postures and relaxation episodes. The sequence is always the same, on a calm and progressive rhythm. The regularity of the postures invites you to a greater control of these, as well as to a clear evolution of your practice. The attention is put on the breathing and the relaxation, in order to relax the psychic and the body, to go deeper in each posture and to enter meditation. This type of Yoga is for all levels. A Sivananda course lasts 1h30.

Her passions for yoga and cooking have always guided Mary: yoga is what first awakened her the appetite for better nutrition. After living for 3 months in an ashram, his daily life completely changed! Apart from daily meditations and regular postures, healthy eating (vegetarian) is an aspect of yogic life she could discover. His interests in the philosophy of Yoga and the health of the body and mind encouraged him to pursue a bachelor’s degree in philosophy at the Université Libre de Bruxelles (2016).

Marie has been teaching yoga since 2013 and continues to enrich her practice and knowledge through various learning experiences. She is currently training as a yoga teacher in Ashtanga Yoga, with Jean-Claude Garnier.

Marie Wittock – La Meilleure Part

Best of yourself with yoga & food

+32 474/53.82.93 –

www.lameilleurepart.com

 

Yoga alternate teacher, Alice Haumont, training

 

Trained in dance (classical and contemporary) in my childhood, graduate and researcher in Philosophy (Free University of Brussels, 1994-2004), I found in the practice of Ashtanga Yoga the meeting point of these two passions.

This discovery of Ashtanga Yoga constitutes for me a true discipline as well as a deep tool of self-knowledge. This led me to undertake the training of a teacher taught by Jean-Claude Garnier, of whom I have been faithful to the teaching for several years.

“Simply be present with your own shifting energies
and with unpredictability of life as it unfolds.”

K. Pattabhi Jois.

Contact information :

 

 

Ashtanga Yoga News Letter 3 : march 2019

Yoga « way to fullness » … 

The "Hindu Trinity", Brahma, Vishnū, Ćiva.

The “Hindu Trinity”, Brahma, Vishnū, Ćiva.

On the way to the intuition of “non-duality”, we try to be coherent yet if we are honest with ourselves we know how hard it is. For example, you are asked to stand up straight, we think and feel that we are vertical, but if we look in a mirror, we will see that this is an illusion, we have a shoulder higher than the other, the head inclined to one side, the pelvis rotated, a knee bent, the belly forward or backward, more support on one foot, etc.. In short, we are twisted. It is the same in postural yoga practice “asana” (Devanāgarī: आसन). We need an outside perspective to straighten, untwist and align ourselves, in order to go vertical.

During his first meeting with Guruji (Sri K. Pattabhi Jois), Anne expressed “it’s strange, but for the first time in my life I experienced a person other than myself you knew better than me what was good for me … and I trusted … “him.

Transmission of Yoga exists in this relational quality. It is a relationship of love, without love there is nothing of value, we cannot achieve the “Kingdom of Heaven” for a Christian, or what we call “Deep Reality” in Yoga.

The practice of Yoga Mala is a precision work (from the Latin praecisus), i.e. “no split” without division of breathing, movement, concentration, rhythm etc.. It is a work of unification. Hindus, like Christians might say  to live a relationship state of “Trinity.”

Three not two, two is not  one… The Trinity is not a duality and non-duality “advaïta” (Devanāgarī: अ त) is not unity. This is articulated One between “I” and “you” of ourselves, a … A relational One 

«Oh yoguin, ne pratique pas le Yoga sans vinyāsa…»
Vāmana Ṛṣi (devanāgarī : वामन ऋषि)
Yoga Korunta

Forth yoga Korunta  śloka express :

« Trī stanam avalokayé

Āsanam prānāyāma dristhihi »

Translation

The three key points of the method are: posture, breathing and concentration of the gaze.

Shri K. Pattabhi Jois’s comment

The method of yoga Korunta consists of three simultaneously performed points, that are:

a. Posture Āsana : to lengthen and stretch the spine back to ensure good blood circulation;

b. Breathing Pranayama : The wide opened rib cage so that breathing is good, long and soft;

c. Dristhihi : The head in alignment and directed towards one of the nine focus points so that the mind is concentrated. In this way, in your practice, you will not be troubled by what is happening around you and within you.


Guruji (Sri K. Pattabhi Jois), Laksmi Puram, Mysore

Om Shanti,

JC Garnier

History of Yoga Korunta (Ashtanga Yoga)

Travelling in the North of India to spread the science of Yoga for the treatment of various ailments, Sri T. Krishnamacharya – thanks to the patronage of the Maharajah of Mysore (well known for his philanthropy and spiritual faith) – discovered by chance, in the 1930s, in the university Library of Calcutta, an ancient manuscript written on palm leaves and entitled “Yoga Korunta”. The author, a sage of ancient times, called himself “Vanama”. Composed between 500 and 1500 BC, the document was excellently preserved. Also a specialist in ancient Sanskrit, Sri T. Krishnamacharya understood from the turn of certain phrases that it was part of a much older oral tradition (between 3000 and 4000 years BC).

Sri T. Krishnamacharya

Sri T. Krishnamacharya

Following this discovery, Sri T. Krishnamacharya, who taught a different method of yoga, altered his teaching for the third time. He asked Sri K. Pattabhi Jois to devote himself exclusively to this method of original Yoga, called Yoga Korunta, and to pass it on.

From 1937 onwards, Pattabhi taught Yoga Korunta in Mysore, India.

Only in the late 1960s, André Van Lysebeth, the first teacher of European yoga, spends three months to study Yoga in India with Pattabhi.

André speaks of him and the quality of his training and popularizes him by publishing laudatory articles in the paper « YOGA » which he edits.

La "REVUE YOGA"

La “REVUE YOGA”

Around 1973, Americans participate in the demonstration of yoga by Manju (Pattabhi’s son) in the ashram of Gitānanda (near Pondicherry). Thus Norman Allen became a pupil of Pattabhi or Guruji, as his disciples call him, later Nancy Gilgoff and David Williams came.

Pattabhi chose to use the term “Ashtanga” for his school in reference to one of the six points of view of orthodox Indian philosophy, i.e. Yoga. The other points of view are: Nyāya, Vaisheshika, Sāṃkhya, Mîmâmsâ, Vedānta.

The bible of Yoga, written by Patañjali, is “The Yoga Sūtra” (a kind of synthesis of all the preceding knowledge).

In the second chapter of this book, at verse (YS II-29) the foundations of the practice of yoga are being explained, the definition of which is “aṣṭāṅga yoga”. Thus, all the spiritual techniques referring to this book can be called aṣṭāṅga yoga.

This way the name of “Yoga Korunta” was changed to “Ashtanga Yoga”. Actually, the institute of Pattabhi was called “Ashtanga Yoga Research Institute of Mysore”, which made the American students think that he taught a kind of Yoga called “Ashtanga Yoga”.

In 1975, Nancy Gilgoff and David Williams invited Guruji and his son Manju, who thus set off on their first voyage to America in order to teach yoga. Manju stayed in the United States. This practice of Yoga spread rapidly throughout America from California, extending up to Hawaii, under the name of Ashtanga Yoga.

Les livrets de JB Rishi sur l'Ashtanga Yoga

In Europe, the first teachers to spread this method were called Jean-Pierre Radhu (Belgium), Gabriel Plessis (Paris, Rouen – 1972). With the permission of Guruji, Jean Bernard Rishi in Paris (France 1975) published leaflets on the sun salutations of Mysore and the standing postures (photos of Pattabhi in black and white). Having taught Ashtanga Yoga for several years, they all changed their methods of different reasons. Later, Jean Claude Garnier (France, Belgium – 1978) and Serge Fonteneau (France, Château Renauld) embraced the teachings of Pattabhi and have made it their business to disseminate them.

Today, this traditional form of Yoga, mainly known under the name of Ashtanga Yoga, is one of the most practiced worldwide.

Sharath Rangaswamy, the grandson of Sri K. Pattabhi Jois, teaches the Ashtanga Yoga he has learnt from his grandfather.

 

For further reading :

  • Yoga Mala – Sri K. Pattabhi Jois (paperback)
  • Ashtanga Yoga – John Scott (Le courrier du livre).
  • Ashtanga Yoga – Le Guide Pratique: Un Guide Illustré Destiné à une Pratique Personnelle, Première et Deuxième… de David Swenson

Yoga Teacher Catherine Delvosal

Having started to study philosophy at ULB in 1988, my interest in Yoga came from my dissatisfaction having not found, in occidental questioning, answers related to my deeper aspirations and my need to create. They were always in disagreement with rational explanations.

I followed with pleasure, the teaching given by:

Gina Scaritto (yoga pre & post natal Brussels – Leboyer method)
Viviane Gutlerner (B.K.S. Iyengar) Brussels
Daniel Rougier (Hatha Yoga & Intégral Yoga of Sri Aurobindo)
David Weemaels (B.K.S. Iyengar)
Stanislasva Benova made me discover the Ashtanga Yoga in 2008 and since I am pursuing this teaching with Anne Pinette & Jean Claude Garnier

Specifically, after of five years of regular practice of Ashtanga Yoga, I have began to realize the immense task still awaitig me, but also already this deep joy that I am ready to share with you.

 

Mobile : 0473 83 61 74

Email :  catdelvosal@gmail.com

 

 

Jean Claude Garnier

Jean Claude Garnier was born on 10 March 1948 at Rouen in Normandy, France. Seriously ill during his childhood, he discovered yoga by reading Indra Devi’s book; she was the first American to study yoga with Sri Krishnamacharya. He was then 14 years old.

Krishnamacharya & Desikachar & Indra Devi

Krishnamacharya, Desikachar & Indra Devi

He followed his path with the companions of the “Communauté de l’Arche”, founded by Lanza Del Vasto, the first Christian disciple of Mahatma Gandhi. He was 20 when, on their recommendation, he met Jean-Paul Boudon (Satyananda Bihar School) and B.K.S. Iyengar.

At the beginning of his first two-year trip to India, while digging wells and improving land for agriculture, he met Vinoba Bhave, Gandhi’s successor. He studied yoga with Swami Gitanandha in Pondicherry and then stayed for a time at Sri Aurobindo’s ashram where he met “The Mother”.

Jean Claude, digging the foundations of the Matrimandir, Auroville, India

He came back to France in 1972, and lived for a few months in Father Dechanet’s hermitage. In 1973 he started his first yoga classes in Rouen. At the same time, he pursued his yoga teacher training with Denise and André Van Lysebeth in Switzerland.

He then studied with Jean-Bernard Rishi who at that time was one of Pattabhi Jois’s students. He met BKS Iyengar through Noël Perrez and was so impressed that he went to Puna to study with him for several years.

On a trip in South India in 1978 he met Sri Pattabhi Jois who became his Master. He studied with him every year until 1998.

To better understand anatomy and the locomotor system, Jean Claude decided to learn general and cranial osteopathy. He then began psycho-corporal psychotherapy in accordance with W. Reich’s theories, and followed several courses to become a psychotherapist.

JC en1973 en Eka Pada Shrisasana

JC en1973 en Eka Pada Shrisasana

He then learned energetic osteopathy, acupuncture and dietetics. He has been a vegetarian for 47 years.

Jean Claude enjoys combining all his knowledge and experience. He divides his time between teaching yoga – in Brussels, at the Institute he has lovingly created in Uccle, and in France, Greece and India – and giving treatment in energetic, general and cranial osteopathy, and acupuncture.

The yoga teaching he gives is faithful to the Yoga Korunta transmitted by Sri Pattabhi Jois at the “Asthanga Research Institute” in Mysore.

Sri K. Pattabhi Jois

Sri K. Pattabhi Jois

Sri Tirumalai Krishnamarcharya, one of the greatest masters of yoga (1888 – 1988)

Sri T. Krishnamacharya, one of the greatest masters of yoga, the light of his knowledge has profoundly influenced the whole world.

He has never left anyone indifferent. In the course of a life that would easily fill several ordinary lives, he had many extraordinary encounters. A descendant of the great priests serving at the temple of the Lord of the Seven Hills, who in turn were descendants of Nâthamuni, Sri Venkateshvara of Tirumalai, this teacher had been promised an exceptional destiny at his birth. Nothing commonplace could happen to him.

Sri Tirumalai Krishnamacharya was born on 18 November 1888, the eldest of six children (four boys and two girls).

His father, Sri Tirumalai Srinivasa Thathacharya, a great religious master teaching the knowledge of the holy books (the Vedas), takes charge of the child’s education with his wife Shrimati Ranganayakamma.

The young Krishnamacharya is gifted with great physical force, coupled with extraordinary temperament and intelligence. He also suffused with an intense ardour to know and… to know how.

Still an adolescent, Krishnamacharya sets off to discover his country, its sages, its scholars, its artists and its mystics.

An incredible journey is the life of this young man who will by and by discover, then master, the most varied disciplines, from close-quarters combat to astrology to Vedic rituals.

A well of sciences, fluent in seven languages, an eminent pundit, he will successively explore each of the classical viewpoints of Indian philosophical thought, obtaining the highest distinctions in the most celebrated traditional schools.

Benares, Varanasi, India in 1922

Benares, Varanasi, India in 1922

Varanasi

When he left for Benares for the first time, around the age of 18, he was fortunate to be instructed in certain secrets of Sanskrit grammar in the course of a single night by a sort of genius, Shivakumar Shâstri. Back in Mysore, he received an exhaustive three-year education in the philosophy of Vedânta by the director of Parakala Mutt, Brahmatantra Sri Krishna Brahmatantra Swâmi. Once again back to Benares, he found there a deeply enlightened tutor, Sri Vamacarana Bhattâchârya who, while teaching him philosophy, alsohelped him for years giving him advice on how to live his life.

The holy lake of Mânasarovar…

As advised by his tutor at the University of Patna, he then set off on foot for the Himalayas. By difficult paths and rope bridges over spanning torrents, he arrived at the foot of Kailash, the mythical mountain considered to be the abode of Shiva and the axis of the universe, and at the holy lake of Mânasarovar.

Yoga

He learns and practices intensively all the different aspects of yoga. Thus, in the second phase of his life, he will become one of the greatest (Maha) yogi (âcharya) of his time.

Maharaja of Mysore, painting

Maharaja of Mysore, painting

The maharajah of Mysore

In 1924, he is invited by the maharajah of Mysore who viened yoga as a help in treating his numerous physical ailments. He opened a yoga school in his palace in 1955.

He established himself in Mysore

He is already in his forties when he established himself in Mysore, in the South of India, there he marries the very young Srimati Namaginammal. She will give him six children, three boys and three girls.

Srimati Namaginammal wife of Krishnamacharya

Srimati Namaginammal wife of Krishnamacharya

Madras (Chennai)

When he established himself in Madras in the fifties, he once again had the opportunity to treat two men in very senior positions. Both suffered from paralysis: an eminent lawyer Sri T.R. Venkatarâma Shâstrî and Sir Alladi Krishnaswâmi Iyer, the celebrated jurist who had participated in the drafting of the Indian constitution. Both, causing him stay Madras, added themselves to the long list of crucial encounters that influenced the course of his life. (Extract of N° 24 of Viniyoga, dedicated to the 100th anniversary of Sri T. Krishnamacharya).

 

The legend of Yoga-Rahasya

Of the Yoga-Rahasya, an important work on yoga that had been lost for several centuries, only a few excerpts were known. Krishnamacharya declared having received the whole of this original teaching in a dream from the mouth of Sri Nâthamuni, this Vishnu saint who lived in the 9th century

It was not until 1965 that T. Krishnamacharya wrote the verses of Yoga Rahaysa down on paper.

The important concepts of this text are:

  • The importance of yoga for women
  • The yoga practices to follow during pregnancy
  • The adaptation of yoga to make it suitable for everyone in different stages of his life
  • Yoga is an essential therapeutic tool

It contains the main ideas of the teachings of Krishnamacharya on techniques such as āsana and Prāṇāyāma.

T.K.V. Deskachar & Shri Bhashyam

Two of their sons also became yoga instructors.

The elder one, T.K.V. Deskachar, lives in Madras, and manages an important yoga therapy centre – the Krisnamacharya Yoga Mandiram – officially recognized by the Health Ministry of Tamil Nadu.

Sri Bhashyam, his pupil, lives in Nice (France). He has married a Frenchwoman and teaches yoga mainly in France and Switzerland – Yogakshemam, a school teaching traditional Indian philosophy – Ayurveda and Yoga.

 Dissemination…

Compared to the occident, the dissemination of the teachings of T. Krishnamacharya incurred a strange fate.

  • Indra Devi
  • Yvonne Millerand
  • K.V. Desikachar
  • K. Sribhashyam
  • Sri B.K.S. Iyengar
  • Sri K. Pattabhi Jois

Mainly due to the engagement of his two sons and their pupils, it is firmly rooted in French speaking countries (France, Switzerland & Quebec).

In Anglo-Saxon countries, this teaching is better known through the interpretation provided by his brother-in-law and pupil, B.K.S. Iyengar with his worldwide reputation – as well as that of Sri K. Pattabhi Jois, also known worldwide.

 abtkym_sandals

His death

He died on 28 February 1989 in Chennai in the South of India. He was nearly 101 years of age. The teacher Sri T. Krishnamacharya will for many remain an unmatched and irreplaceable master of yoga…

In accordance with tradition, he never left his native India in his life. Nevertheless, the light of his knowledge of yoga has profoundly influenced the whole world.

“Yoga is the greatest gift of India to the world.”

Sri T. Krishnamacharya

Sources:

  • The Yoga of the Yoga The legacy of T Krishnamacharya by Kausthud Desikachar – Edition: K. Y. M – Chennai – India
  • Shri T. Krishnamacharya 1888 – 1988 Cent ans de Béatitude
  • Notebook
    Edition: K. Y. M – Chennai – India
  • La revue « Viniyoga » n° 24
  • Yoga Sutra de Patanjali – Translation and commentary by K.V. Desikachar – Edition du Rocher – 1986
  • Reflection on Yoga Sutra – s of Patanjali – By K.V. Desikachar
    KYM – ISBN: 81.87847.20.4
  • The Heart of Yoga – Developing a Personal Practice – By K.V. Desikachar
    KYM – ISBN: 0.89281.681.3
Breath Of The Gods

Breath Of The Gods

Film:

Breath of the Gods, A Journey to the Origins of Modern Yoga, by Jan Schmidt – Garre Film – Length 105 minutes

  • K.S. IYENGAR
  • PATTABHI JOIS
  • K. SRIBHASHYAM
  • KRISHNAMACHARYA

Very beautiful and moving testimony to the life of Sri T. Krishnamacharya as recalled by his students, his children…

Websites:

Become an Ashtanga Yoga professor thanks to the training given by the Ashtanga Yoga Institute in Brussels

The Ashtanga Yoga Institute in Brussels perpetuates the teachings of Sri K. Pattabhi Jois. Since 1973, Jean Claude Garnier trains students, in Europe and Asia, to deepen their knowledge about Yoga. Some of the students will find a calling and become a Yoga Professor and in turn, transmit the art of Yoga.

The Institute is open to different currents of Yoga. Jean Claude Garnier pursues the transmission of Ashtanga Yoga as taught by Krishnamacharya and his disciples B.K.S. Iyengar, and Sri K. Pattabhi Jois.

Sri K. Pattabhi Jois

Sri K. Pattabhi Jois

Training and recycling as a Yoga professor, who is concerned ?

  • People who practice Yoga and wish to deepen their self-knowledge in order to obtain a better body and mind balance
  • Those who wish to deepen their approach of the tradition of Yoga
  • Future teachers who wish to teach Yoga in Europe – this requires a commitment to a course of minimum 5 modules
  • Existing Yoga teachers who wish to broaden their personal knowledge with an ancient and dynamic method
  • Yoga teachers who have the obligation to improve and develop their existing skills

How does the training with personal monitoring take place ?

  • You deepen your knowledge of the practice of Yoga: first, second and third series
  • You study Yoga and its philosophy
  • You learn to observe during classes (group and private classes)
  • You progressively assist the teacher during classes
  • You will be supervised as of your first class, in order to answer your questions.

How to obtain a diploma

The Yoga teacher training consists of a set of modules.

At the end of each module there is a practical and theoretical evaluation.

Once you have successfully passed a module, you can move on to the next one.

You need to complete a minimum of 5 modules (A, B, C, D, E, F) and write a thesis which summarizes your studies and research on one of the aspects of Yoga.

This diploma is a requisite to :

  • Practice the profession in European countries
  • Teach in a recognised Institute
  • Register to the national professional database
  • Get an insurance
  • As an asset for your students

 European PDF laws

European Yoga Union: http://www.yogaeurop.com/index.php?categoryid=21

Proto Shiva, of the Indus civilization

Proto Shiva, of the Indus civilization

 Content covered during the training

Theoretical documentation will be given to you at the end of each module in electronic version (with an access to “training”)

 Topics

  • Anatomy
  • Physiology
  • Psychology
  • Pedagogy
  • Professional ethics
  • History
  • Etymology
  • Indian sacred texts

Also discussed: communication, oral and written expression, dietetics, lifestyle…

 Course content of Training Module A

  • Postural practice first & second series (Sádhaná Yoga)

Postural foundations, supports, reviewing and improvement of postures and their variations; breathing techniques in postures (pranayama); development of concentration, letting go, individual work and group work, workshops, first trials of teaching.

 

Theoretical courses

  • Classical Indian Tradition through its Vedic origins
  • Invocations (prayer at the beginning of the class): explanation, its significance and its meaning.
  • Theory and practice of Ashtanga Yoga (Mula Bandha, uddiyana, Ujjayi Pranayama, Vinyasa)
  • Knowledge of anatomy related to postural practice
  • Importance of stretching during Yoga postures
  • Use of Sanskrit during courses
  • Religious festivals
  • The creation of the world (Taittiriya Aranyaka viewed by Veda)
  • The life, work and education of Sivananda, Sri Ramakrishna, Swami Ramdas, Yogi Ram Surat Kumar, Sri Yukheswar, Alain Danielou, Krishnamurti.

Check the PDF files to see the content of the other training modules

Admissions

The admission procedures are common to all schools of the National Federation of Yoga Teachers

To enrol in the first year of training you must:

  • Have practiced Yoga for at least 2 years with one or more teachers and have one of the teachers complete a sponsorship record
  • Be over 18 years old
  • Have a general level of education or equivalent vocational training at high-school level.

When and where:

  • India: the longest training (one month)
  • Greece: condensed training (two weeks)
  • Belgium: all year long (10 weekends from September to June / July)

Addressing and coming out of a posture in Ashtanga Yoga practice (Vinyāsa Krama)

In Ashtanga Yoga practice (Yoga Korunta), there is a precise progression, established with a lot of wisdom, in order to address a posture add also to come out of it. This is called Vinyāsa Krama.

The postures are connected one with another by mini-sequences or complete sequences from the sun salutation (Surya Namaskara).

Ashtanga Yoga_Adho Mukha Svannasana _suryanamaskara_A

 

 

In Ashtanga Yoga, the postural work and the Viniyasa have equal importance. At first, we see the postural learning with a simple chain/sequence. Once the postures are known comes the sequences/chaining teaching (the complete Viniyasa).

Srivatsa Ramaswami, old student of Shri T. Krishnamacharya

Srivatsa Ramaswami, old student of Shri T. Krishnamacharya

«Integrating the spirit, body and breathing functions . . . A yogi will know the true joy of the yoga practice . . .Vinyāsa Krama yoga strictly follows the most complete
definition of classical yoga ».

Srivatsa Ramaswami

There are two important factors.

  1. All the postures (āsana) are in an unchangeable order.
  2. As beautifully taught by Sri K. Pattabhi Jois, there are a precise number of synchronised breathing and movement transitions that connect each position (āsana).

The process of Vinyāsa Krama produces an intense internal heat (tapas) that allows purification, and elimination of toxins in the muscles, the organs and the mind. The result is a light body that breaths profound peace, strength and joy.

Practice of Yoga mālā is a true precision work (from latin prae-cisus), in other words «without scission», without division of breathing, movement, concentration, rhythm etc. It is a work of reunification, of unification.